Magic and Mysticism in Scandinavian Vernacular Architecture – on Folklore, Superstition and on How the Gods Really Were in the Details…

I found this very interesting article reblogged by Ehsha Apple this morning and am reblogging it myself from the source site Creative Flux which is from a lady who was born in Sweden and lives in Oregon working as a designer and contractor in an environmental and re-purposing way (check out her About page for more), She hit the nail on the head here showing how old wood design in buildings often reflected the older pagan beliefs. I also love her post on How the Old Masters Selected Wood which is fascinating. In the last few decades I would say i have learned more about the old “Wiccan/Pagan” ways from books and articles on archeology, history and anthropology than from any books directly on those subjects. Enjoy!

The Creative Flux

The urge to decorate is as old as mankind. Since time immemorial, adornments have served as status indicators, cultural and national insignia, as well as tribal trademarks. Heraldic badges and coats of arms mark political and familial affiliations, and entire power structures are ranked according to number of stripes or the colors of their dress.  During times when large portions of the populace were illiterate, painted and sculpted decor served to inform, educate and intimidate. Our various modes of decoration can place us in a temporal continuum as fashionable styles come and go, and entire dissertations have been written on whether surface ornamentation in architecture is even a legitimate practice – or not. So, considering the endless number of uses for all kinds of adornments, I suppose I shouldn’t have been so surprised when I learned that builders – even in christianized, medieval Scandinavia – carved ancient symbols, etched messages…

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